Tuesday, 20 May 2014

Classification Of NSAIDs (Non Steroidal Ani Inflammatory Drugs)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs are a class of drugs that provides analgesic (pain-killing) and antipyretic (fever-reducing) effects, and, in higher doses, anti-inflammatory effects.

The term nonsteroidal distinguishes these drugs from steroids, which, among a broad range of other effects, have a similar eicosanoid-depressing, anti-inflammatory action. As analgesics, NSAIDs are unusual in that they are non-narcotic and thus are used as a non-addictive alternative to narcotics.

NSAID identification on label of generic Ibuprofen an OTC NSAID. The most prominent members of this group of drugs, aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, are all available over the counter in most countries.[1] Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is not considered an NSAID because it has little anti-inflammatory activity. It treats pain mainly by blocking COX-2 mostly in the central nervous system, but not much in the rest of the body.

NSAIDs inhibit the activity of both cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and thereby, the synthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxanes. It is thought that inhibiting COX-2 leads to the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic effects and that those NSAIDs also inhibiting COX-1, particularly aspirin, may cause gastrointestinal bleeding and ulcers. For this reason, the advantages of COX-2 selective inhibitors may be indicated.


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